Virender Sehwag Rips Into IPL Flops, Calls Glenn Maxwell “10-Crore Cheerleader”


Virender Sehwag Rips Into IPL Flops, Calls Glenn Maxwell "10-Crore Cheerleader"

Glenn Maxwell scored 108 runs from 13 matches at 15.42 in IPL 2020.© BCCI/IPL




Virender Sehwag called Kings XI Punjab’s Glenn Maxwell a “10 crore cheerleader” in a snide remark on Maxwell’s indifferent form this Indian Premier League season. Sehwag posted a video on his Facebook page where he picked out his hits and misses from IPL 2020 and named Maxwell as one of the misses. Sehwag said in Hindi: “Glenn Maxwell. This 10-crore cheerleader proved costly for Punjab. And he has had a bad record of shirking work over the past few seasons. But this season he went to new extremes.”

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“This is what you call a highly-paid vacation,” he added.

Maxwell scored just 108 runs from 13 matches this season at an average of 15.42 and picked up three wickets with his right-arm off spin.

Sehwag tore into the other big-ticket players as well who didn’t have the best IPL season, including Dale Steyn.

“There was a time when everyone was afraid of the Steyn Gun. But this season the Steyn Gun didn’t show up. Instead, we got a homemade pipe gun (desi katta),” said Sehwag.

Steyn played just three matches this season for Royal Challengers Bangalore and conceded at 11.40 runs per over. He picked up only one wicket.

Steyn’s last IPL season, in 2019, was cut short due to an injury that also saw him sitting out of the World Cup that year.

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Sehwag picked out RCB’s Aaron Finch, Chennai Super Kings’ Shane Watson and Kolkata Knight Riders’ Andre Russell as his other misses from the 2020 IPL season. 

Among the hits were Jasprit Bumrah, Kagiso Rabada, Jofra Archer, KL Rahul and Hardik Pandya.

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